beebee
Fall is now upon us.
The days are shorter but still reaching into the mid nineties by the afternoon but the nights are falling into the sixties now, which makes for nicer sleeping and cooler mornings.

Now it's not so stinking hot it's time to get some outdoor things done ! Things that were pretty well impossible to do w the heat and mosquitos over the summer. The weeds have taken over. Lots of them. 😧

When we last spoke in the spring I had bought a vanilla bean cutting about 18" long and was going to root it, which I did. I cut it into two pieces about 9" long each.

IMG_2433.jpg 

See here. The roots have started.

And here they are now after being potted and after their first summers growth. About two feet high and climbing. 

IMG_2631.jpg 
Oh and whats that beside them? Thats the only one of the little cuttings his wife gave me the took root.
Bern's southern glory bleeding heart and it's got its first flower. Looks like a grasshopper took a bite or two out of a leaf though.

IMG_2632.jpgTBC

🐝
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 1 0
PaganWoman
Wow vanilla beans...yum!  Oris it a form of orchid.
Love Wins...it takes time and seems as if it will never truly win ....believe it will ~PaganWoman
Quote 0 0
beebee
Pineapples next or Orchids?

Okay Pineapples and Ferengis it is.

Don't ask me why I call them 'Ferengis' but i do. Everyone in my family know which plants I am referring to, but for you, so you know how to get one too, are actually Hawaiian Plumeria or Frangipani. 

IMG_2635.jpg 

I wish I had photographed them while in flower, which is now over with but this is what their flowers look like.

IMG_0001.jpg 


IMG_3563.jpg 

The yellow and white flowers are the more common of the two and I have two of these and one the red ones.

I feed them bananas that have gone rotten on me which happens more times than, I'd like to admit and they love them. So do my orchids. It must be the potassium.

They are very slow growers maybe only 3 or 4 inches a year and on a bumper year 6". This year mine forked at the top which I was very pleased to see. I've owned them over a decade and transplanted them three times.

They are tropical and will not withstand a freeze. In the fall, even in southern climes they will lose all their leaves, which they now beginning to do and look like stick scaffolds. I bring mine indoors to overwinter and I'm sure people wonder what these stick plants must be or must think I have a brown thumb.

This fall for the first time ever they are getting a couple of beans on them very similar looking to vanilla beans. When they dry, I shall save them and see in the spring whether the seeds from them will grow.

IMG_2638.jpg  IMG_2640.jpg 
 
Here are the pineapples.
These two I planted last summer. 
I simply twisted the top of a pineapple I'm going to eat and stick it in some soil in a pot. Even if the top look brown and withered, trust me with a little water, they will grow and become a silver green.

IMG_2634.jpg 

This kauna had its third summer. It's the one that overwintered in my bathroom and one morning I noticed a snake was sunning on one of its long leaves apparently overwintering in my bathroom too! It got unceremoniously thrown out on the lawn, snake and all and has since been recovering.

IMG_2645.jpg
It's gotten quite large now but still no pineapples. Who knows maybe next year?

Up next Orchids.

🐝 
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0
PaganWoman
They are beautiful...all of them just beautiful.  I have tried to grow Plumeria but I am not successful.  I don't know i fit is too hot here or if I over water.  The flowers to me are more beautiful than orchids - which are pretty darn beautiful.  You clearly have a green thumb.  When I retire I am going to garden all the time...it will be my favorite past time. 

I have been able periodically to have a garden through out my life and growing things we can eat give me huge pleasure.  
Love Wins...it takes time and seems as if it will never truly win ....believe it will ~PaganWoman
Quote 1 0
beebee
PaganWoman wrote:
They are beautiful...all of them just beautiful.  I have tried to grow Plumeria but I am not successful.  I don't know i fit is too hot here or if I over water.  The flowers to me are more beautiful than orchids - which are pretty darn beautiful.  You clearly have a green thumb.  When I retire I am going to garden all the time...it will be my favorite past time. 

I have been able periodically to have a garden through out my life and growing things we can eat give me huge pleasure.  


I would think in San Diego they should do just fine and they do like lots of water. It rains here almost every afternoon  here during the summer, just to make sure it’s not only hot and buggy but also muggy. On the days it doesn’t rain, I water them although they can stand to go a day or two without, but then their leaves start to wilt, especially if potted as mine are. They dry out faster. 

I lived in the San Fran Bay Area for many years and grew everything. 30 varieties of roses, dahlias, artichokes, giant zucchini, beans, peppers, lots of heritage tomatoes, giant sunflowers with plate size heads, Myers lemons and even corn.

I had a side garden that was shaded that my kids called the Mystery Garden, which was really my north western garden, w rhodendrums, Camilla’s, hydrangea, Japanese peonies and a Passion flower vine that grew over the fence. We had a little table out there with a small water fountain on it and I nestled the rocks I had collected on my travels between the plants. It was a nice and peaceful place to sit.

A96C4D3D-DFFA-4E23-B07D-AA5E5ED257B2.jpeg 

8563BEC4-AE5F-40E3-91C9-DCCF1363A8BB.jpeg 
When I moved to Florida, it was a whole nuther ball of wax. Things I was used to growing in California and when, just wouldn’t grow here. I tried growing tomatoes starting in May, like I used to and they wouldn’t grow. They’d get powdery mild dew in the humidity then other things got to them in their weaken state such as white flies.

You don’t grow tomatoes or much of anything other than watermelons and avocados in the summer in Florida. However as I came to learn there are two growing seasons here, but you have to be right on time. Spring and fall.

For awhile I didn’t grow anything, which isn’t like me, but after my parents both passed I felt very depressed, Because of that, one day I decided I was going to grow orchids and learn more about them and so I did. I had always wanted to grow them anyway, so I decided rather then spending $ on therapy etc, I’d splurge a little on something I had always loved to do, which brought me much pleasure, that being growing things.

So I bought books on how to grow orchids, went to orchid nurseries, shows and bought some young ones off of ebay, mostly from Hawaii, but also a couple of even more exotic ones from places such as Thailand, Vietnam etc.

All in all I probably had about 30. I had developed a bad case of Orchid Madness. I even read novels about them. The Orchid Hunter is truly a fascinating book about the hired orchid hunters from around the world, in Victorian era and old ladies getting busted in London for having possession of them in their basements because only Keslington Gardens was allowed to keep them. The Orchid Thief which was later made into movie ‘Adaption’ with Meryle Streep and Nicolas Cage was about searching for the elusive Ghost Orchid in the Everglades.

I had Hono hona’s, Dendrobium, Cattleya, Laelia, Brassavola, Oncidium, lots of Vandas with long trailing roots, Phalaenopis and many more. There are over 30,000 species of orchids so perhaps I wasn’t too obsessed but I met people who had greenhouses of full of orchids who were. We always clicked. It was their life passion. They would cross breed them in Petri dishes,  get refrigerated flasks of spores shipped to them from remote locations and other growers.

B08F2AB8-531E-4A84-8009-646EFDC897BC.jpeg  0AFC5697-57C4-46C2-91E2-901AA2EF26AB.jpeg  BDB54636-358B-4D8F-A214-CEF1B00D72B3.jpeg 
(Brought in during a cold spell in Pinellas)

I had my orchids and took good care of them for many years. Fed, watered, transplanted, divided them but unfortunately I lost a lot of them during a move to Northern Florida when I was going back and forth between two houses, and sometimes they were left alone for too long and didn’t get the attention and moisture they needed.

They also didn’t do so well in the more northern climate as even though where I now am is still in Florida, we are above the frost line and it freezes almost nightly here during the winter. Drops at night to the low 30’s high 20’s and then returns to 60-70 during the day.

So now I only have a few survivors.

TBC

🐝
  
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0
beebee
So what was it I was going to talk about before I got sidetracked by talking about orchids?
Oh yes it was Orchids! 😺

I don’t even know why I’m bring this all up except for the fact I repotted some Phalaennopis last week and felt good that I had finally done something other than having my head glued to politics.

So let me tell you about Phalaennopis as originally they were my least favorite orchid. Probably because they are the most commercially grown/massed produced. They are quite beautiful and can be very spectacular, but they are the ones you commonly see at the Home Depot, Wally and Costco, and why originally being a bit of an orchid snob I avoided them.

If you go to a beach you’ve never been before, and there are a tons of the same shells scattered everywhere, even though they may be new to you, if you are a shell collector your eyes will roam around looking for the one most unlike the rest. Don’t ask me how I know. And this is what I originally did with orchids. I saw Phalaennopis grown in huge warehouse like greenhouses by the gazillion, for production and I learned that they could be forced to bloom all at the same time by lowering and reducing the light hours. Who would do that to a poor defenseless plant?

Honestly, such cruelty!
Worst of all Wally would sometimes have them dyed blue and sprinkle glitter on them as they do with some of their poinsettia. Yuk! Yuk! Yuk!

However I now have a new appreciation for Phalaennopis which supposedly are the easiest to grow for beginners, and it maybe because I can grow them here. Keep them on my window sills during the winter, unlike Vandas one of my favs with three feet of dangling roots that need to be kept constantly moist AND get this! 

They start to bloom during the winter, usually around mid to late December when the days are the shortest and the same flowers last 6 months or more! Yes!

I always say now, don’t buy me cut flowers or roses that will last at the most few days. Buy me a Phalaennopis that will hold it’s flowers for months on end and do this if given minimal care for year after year!

Phalaennopis that got transplanted last week (pictured below) that are staying outside for a couple of weeks so I can mist them with a hose until their roots take hold in the new bark (important to replace it every 2-3 years once it has broken down)

E4114A88-A9CF-4C2C-938D-EBB57E0A503A.jpeg 

And photos of them last winter/spring on my window sills (below)



1990A40C-4107-4438-97BA-D5840D211D79.jpeg  2A9ACE30-D0A9-489A-991D-121A8FF69705.jpeg

48904937-6CBC-4EAD-863B-C8AFDAD9A695.jpeg 

So my advice to you would be to not be an orchid snob like I was, but instead to get one of these. 

They are easy to grow, just water once a week about, depending on how high you are running your heat and they will give you many months of happiness and color during the winter, after winter, after winter. And you can grow them in practically all climates, just don’t put them in direct sunlight. They need light but indirect light.

Any questions?

Don’t be afraid to ask.

Miz Bee 🐝
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0
bernintheusa
Wow, Bee !  Those are just bee-you-tiful.

And I love the shelf they are on.
[3e37b5472dfc1614b78ba3d6c20243e2]
Quote 1 0
bernintheusa
FB6D837E-51F2-496B-B9DF-438D20BCAED7.jpeg 
[3e37b5472dfc1614b78ba3d6c20243e2]
Quote 1 0
beebee
Wow, Bee !  Those are just bee-you-tiful.

And I love the shelf they are on.


You have a very good eye, Bern. We bought that cypress slab on the side of the road from a guy who had his own mill.

We were going to sand it and finished it, leave the outside edge, but I was so excited when we got home, I insisted that we carry it in to see how it looked and fit where I ultimately wanted it to go. And there it has sat ever since that day a couple of years ago. 😄

You know what they say about the best made plans, right?
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0
PaganWoman
beebee wrote:


I would think in San Diego they should do just fine and they do like lots of water. It rains here almost every afternoon  here during the summer, just to make sure it’s not only hot and buggy but also muggy. On the days it doesn’t rain, I water them although they can stand to go a day or two without, but then their leaves start to wilt, especially if potted as mine are. They dry out faster. 

I lived in the San Fran Bay Area for many years and grew everything. 30 varieties of roses, dahlias, artichokes, giant zucchini, beans, peppers, lots of heritage tomatoes, giant sunflowers with plate size heads, Myers lemons and even corn.

I had a side garden that was shaded that my kids called the Mystery Garden, which was really my north western garden, w rhodendrums, Camilla’s, hydrangea, Japanese peonies and a Passion flower vine that grew over the fence. We had a little table out there with a small water fountain on it and I nestled the rocks I had collected on my travels between the plants. It was a nice and peaceful place to sit.

A96C4D3D-DFFA-4E23-B07D-AA5E5ED257B2.jpeg 

8563BEC4-AE5F-40E3-91C9-DCCF1363A8BB.jpeg 
When I moved to Florida, it was a whole nuther ball of wax. Things I was used to growing in California and when, just wouldn’t grow here. I tried growing tomatoes starting in May, like I used to and they wouldn’t grow. They’d get powdery mild dew in the humidity then other things got to them in their weaken state such as white flies.

You don’t grow tomatoes or much of anything other than watermelons and avocados in the summer in Florida. However as I came to learn there are two growing seasons here, but you have to be right on time. Spring and fall.

For awhile I didn’t grow anything, which isn’t like me, but after my parents both passed I felt very depressed, Because of that, one day I decided I was going to grow orchids and learn more about them and so I did. I had always wanted to grow them anyway, so I decided rather then spending $ on therapy etc, I’d splurge a little on something I had always loved to do, which brought me much pleasure, that being growing things.

So I bought books on how to grow orchids, went to orchid nurseries, shows and bought some young ones off of ebay, mostly from Hawaii, but also a couple of even more exotic ones from places such as Thailand, Vietnam etc.

All in all I probably had about 30. I had developed a bad case of Orchid Madness. I even read novels about them. The Orchid Hunter is truly a fascinating book about the hired orchid hunters from around the world, in Victorian era and old ladies getting busted in London for having possession of them in their basements because only Keslington Gardens was allowed to keep them. The Orchid Thief which was later made into movie ‘Adaption’ with Meryle Streep and Nicolas Cage was about searching for the elusive Ghost Orchid in the Everglades.

I had Hono hona’s, Dendrobium, Cattleya, Laelia, Brassavola, Oncidium, lots of Vandas with long trailing roots, Phalaenopis and many more. There are over 30,000 species of orchids so perhaps I wasn’t too obsessed but I met people who had greenhouses of full of orchids who were. We always clicked. It was their life passion. They would cross breed them in Petri dishes,  get refrigerated flasks of spores shipped to them from remote locations and other growers.
  
(Brought in during a cold spell in Pinellas)

I had my orchids and took good care of them for many years. Fed, watered, transplanted, divided them but unfortunately I lost a lot of them during a move to Northern Florida when I was going back and forth between two houses, and sometimes they were left alone for too long and didn’t get the attention and moisture they needed.

They also didn’t do so well in the more northern climate as even though where I now am is still in Florida, we are above the frost line and it freezes almost nightly here during the winter. Drops at night to the low 30’s high 20’s and then returns to 60-70 during the day.

So now I only have a few survivors.

TBC




BeeBee - these are beautiful.  My Grandmother grew passion flowers in her Garden here in San Diego I adored them and was amazed when they would close and then reopen the next day - such a swell smell too.

Plumarias are supposed to grow here - I think it is me!  I have this thing that won't let me grow anything that does not produce food.  It is weird.  A veg garden and I got a green thumb anything of just beauty - NOPE won't grow for me.  

Our community landscaper just laughed at me today because he has never know anyone to kill a broom plant and yet I have.  I love broom and even told the wee brooms I would make sweeping brooms of their sweet smelling branches and yet they did not survive!! 

Too funny eh??
Love Wins...it takes time and seems as if it will never truly win ....believe it will ~PaganWoman
Quote 0 0
beebee
FB6D837E-51F2-496B-B9DF-438D20BCAED7.jpeg 


Aspirant posted a video by Eckhart Tolle- 'The World of Thought'
 https://www.thecommunityforum.life/post/the-world-of-thought-10146627?pid=1308642792
and it made me think more or again about that space between two thoughts that he describes.

That hard to find place where you just are. When you are there in the moment.
When I was younger that was often times when I was ballet dancing or doing gymnastics.
You couldn't be doing a back flip on a balance beam or a dizzying pirouette across the floor and be thinking of much else, 
not unless you wanted to fall down and break your crown.

As I got older, I have found that music also helps me to turn off the noise, that ever ending dialogue/chatter going one in one's own mind.
Gardening also often does that for me, especially when I need to escape all the negativity, we are bombarded with on a daily basis.

So I've been meaning for who knows how many months, especially now that it's well into spring, almost summer, and here  now actually into 100 degree days weather to
update you on some of my plants and gardening efforts.

With the things that help to me sometimes to disconnect, to hopefully remain a little more balanced, but I won't go as far as to say sane. ðŸ˜„

For the purpose of the next few posts, I will call it  this latest espisode 'The Space BetweenThoughts' .
(and it will not be in any chronological order or particular phylum as that would be altogether too sane and we wouldn't want the ego to take over now, would we?)

Bee




We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0
beebee
'The Space Between Two Thoughts' 
The Next Episode in My Gardening.

Where the hell did that come from???


red bloom yellow plant.jpg

Perhaps you'll understand why I decided to name this episode this afterwards, but when I bought this new plant before Easter and it only had a 
couple of yellow flowers on it and since has only had gigantic yellow flowers on it, and a couple of mornings ago I woke up to this red one! 


IMG_3620.jpg 


IMG_3626.jpg 

And I was quickly texting my daughter pics of it and discussing together whether it might be a recessive gene from the parent plant, because
the yellow ones do have some red in the center don't they ?, etc etc etc.
The mind/ego busily at work,  chattering away but still taking a moment because  it sure is beautiful isn't it?
Rather like the George OKeefe painting of the orange poppy?
Crepe like as it first opened early in the morning.

IMG_3742.jpg
The blooms only last one day, but are certainly a most beautiful sight to behold.

TBC  
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0