aspirant
We know of thoughts retrieved from memory but where do creative, unknown thoughts come from?
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beebee
I've often wondered that myself, aspirant.
Where do ideas and sometimes inspiration, or courage come from?

You wrote something the other day and it had to do with the speed of light 160,000 mps vs the speed sound, 
and ask if it was possible that unknown to us, parts of our DNA might be able to pick up signals or info from light.

I thought that was an intriguing thought.
Truly I did.

And I thought about what you had written when I read this today.

Physicists Just Detected a Very Odd Particle That Isn't a Particle at All

quasiparticle
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It sounds like the start of a very bad physics riddle: I'm a particle that really isn't; I vanish before I can even be detected, yet can be seen. I break your understanding of physics but don't overhaul your knowledge. Who am I?

It's an odderon, a particle that's even more odd than its name suggests, and it may have recently been detected at the Large Hadron Collider, the most powerful atom smasher, where particles are zipped at near light speed around a 17-mile-long (27 kilometers) ring near Geneva in Switzerland.

It's just complicated

First off, the odderon is not really a particle. What we think of as particles are usually very stable: electrons, protons, quarks, neutrinos and so on. You can hold a bunch of them in your hand and carry them around with you. Heck, your hand is literally made of them. And your hand isn't vanishing into thin air anytime soon, so we can probably safely assume that its fundamental particles are in for the long term. [7 Strange Facts About Quarks]

~snip~

It's here that physicists face a mathematical dilemma. They can either attempt to fully describe all the complicated messiness that leads to these effervescent patterns, or they can pretend — purely for the sake of convenience — that these patterns are "particles" in their own right, but with odd properties, like negative masses and spins that change with time. [5 Seriously Mind-Boggling Math Facts]

Physicists choose the latter option, and thus the quasiparticle is born. Quasiparticles are brief, effervescent patterns or ripples of energy that appear in the midst of a high-energy particle collision. But since it takes a lot of legwork to fully describe that situation mathematically, physicists take some shortcuts and pretend that these patterns are their own particles. It's done just to make the math easier to handle. So, quasiparticles are treated like particles, even though they definitely aren't.



https://www.space.com/odderons-quasiparticles-detected.html

So there's really a lot we don't know, and it seems to be the more we find out,  the more we realize how much more there is to learn.

I've always been interested in how life got started on earth, for instance.
Was it from Stardust, perhaps an asteroid crashing into earth, that brought life from somewhere else with it?
Who knows? Or how information might be conveyed.
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


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Fire With Fire
I love the odderon!  It was in 1972 at the University of Texas where I was taking a course in astronomy for non-majors.  I can't recall the context, but for some reason or other the area of particle physics came up, and I got my chance to confront an actual astrophysicist with my smartass sophomore questions.  I gather that the sub atomic universe has grown in population since then, but at the time the neutrino was still exotic.  A quick google glance tells me that one of the most exotic attributes of this particle is no longer deemed to be so exotic -- whereas my Prof and I both believed that neutrinos had zero mass, wiki says it just has itty bitty mass, so close to zero as to be hard to perceive.  Okay.

So here was my question:  The neutrino was "discovered" by noting how the mathematical analysis of particle physics experiments opened the question of where did some spin go?  "Didn't the scientists invent the neutrino to have a place to put the missing spin?"

This led to my other question about the literal existence of the "graviton."  My professor fell back on authority without evidence and said that he "really believes in the literal existence of gravitons."


So, after all these decades, I discover that I am not the only smartass walking around:

 

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It's here that physicists face a mathematical dilemma. They can either attempt to fully describe all the complicated messiness that leads to these effervescent patterns, or they can pretend — purely for the sake of convenience — that these patterns are "particles" in their own right, but with odd properties, like negative masses and spins that change with time. [5 Seriously Mind-Boggling Math Facts]

Physicists choose the latter option, and thus the quasiparticle is born. Quasiparticles are brief, effervescent patterns or ripples of energy that appear in the midst of a high-energy particle collision. But since it takes a lot of legwork to fully describe that situation mathematically, physicists take some shortcuts and pretend that these patterns are their own particles. It's done just to make the math easier to handle. So, quasiparticles are treated like particles, even though they definitely aren't.

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beebee
Not really equipped to answer your questions, but as we have spoken of before, our lives have taken such similar paths.

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 It was in 1972 at the University of Texas where I was taking a course in astronomy for non-majors.


I also took an astronomy class at UT in the late 70's to fulfill my science requirements.
Thought it would be an easy and fun class as I was interested in Super Novas, Neutron and Dwarf Stars, Black Holes, etc, etc.
I have to tell you it turned out to be one of,  if not the most difficult class I took. I barely managed to pass it.
It was much more involved than I ever imagined. Math, physics, chemistry, much which was way over my head!

Funny though looking back, at that time no other planet had yet been discovered outside of our solar system, so it was all still
conjecture, a numbers game and we all used to joke about how earlier astronomers actually thought there were canals and water on Mars!

Turns out, doesn't it, that we were all a little bit full of ourselves. 
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


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aspirant
At IU, I used to love the early withdraw and Pass/Fail options when I got blindsided in my Junior and Senior years with something extremely dull and/or above my head.
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