bernintheusa
image.gif  Do you use a Kindle or do you prefer actual hold-in-your-hand books ?      

Do you buy most of your books / ebooks or do you borrow them from the library ?

Do you read one book at a time or do you have several in progress at the same time ?

How about audiobooks ?  Graphic novels ?  The back of cereal boxes ?


[3e37b5472dfc1614b78ba3d6c20243e2]
Quote 1 0
bernintheusa
image.gif       Me, I use a Kindle. I prefer real books, but the Kindle is just so darn convenient. I borrow my ebooks from the library. Usually I'm on a waiting list, but that's OK - I'm in no hurry. And returns are a snap.

One book at a time for me. I have a hard enough time remembering who the characters are, as is - which is another reason I like my Kindle. Just touch the name of a character and Kindle reminds you who it is.

I don't do audiobooks because I don't like to be read to. Graphic novels - no.  Cereal boxes ? - only to find whether or not it contains a decoder ring.
[3e37b5472dfc1614b78ba3d6c20243e2]
Quote 0 0
beebee
Different strokes for different folks.

AND different strokes for the same folk.

I like both. For traveling and inflight, and in bed, Kindle, on a single small device, is nice!
Take a library of many reading choices with you anywhere,

And at home it doesn’t require alphabetized expansive bookshelves, of my father’s John McDonald novels. (of which, don’t tell, I read them all too: in the 70’s). ) Clive Clustlet,. Janet Evonovich, Sue Grafton, Patricia Cornwell, George Carlin, Elmore Lenard, Amy Tan, Bill Bryson, and many others, but as much as I have enjoyed these. there are some I could not the bear not to have a physical copy off, John Irving, Carl Sagan, Shakespeare, (who could read Shakespeare on a kindle?) and Art, photography, coffee table books,, cookbooks, geography- maps and charts. And ohhh, children’s books. I am not going to hold up an iPad and read to a young child! No!

Additionally, I like to sometimes get off of a device, lick my finger and turn a musty page.

I also just wouldn’t consider it hospitable not to have a few books lying around.

But as I say, maybe this is just me. A crossover reader.

A time traveler.

We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0
PaganWoman
Paper, iPhone, Kindle - download PDFs - mostly I like paper - but I am getting used to the kindle and you can carry so many books on one device.  I can't do too many books at a time because I confuse the characters in fiction - non-fiction is even easier.

I would have girls regard themselves not as adjectives, but as nouns.” ~Elizabeth Cady Stanton

"Women are not here as playthings for men...rather as sentient beings to share the wealth and power of the universe equally" ~ PaganWoman

Quote 0 0
beebee
How would you like your prize delivered, Bern?

For some reason I thought, and there again is the problem, that the purpose of this thread was to say you preferred paper!

Wrong again!

Goes to show.
Never assume.

Babe
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0
bernintheusa
Oh, I have a bunch of real books, and many children's books for the grandkids. Many of the children's books belonged to my kids, their daddies. Slowly but surely those books went home with them. My favorite "new" children's books are written by Sandra Boynton. Adorable illustrations, catchy rhymes - kids love 'em.


Some piggy pics for you, Bee.  ⬇️⬇️⬇️

image.jpeg  image.jpeg 

There's many more. You can't go wrong with Sandra Boynton.  
[3e37b5472dfc1614b78ba3d6c20243e2]
Quote 0 0
bernintheusa
Quote:
How would you like your prize delivered, Bern?


Please pass it on to one of our deserving members.Thanks, Bee.
[3e37b5472dfc1614b78ba3d6c20243e2]
Quote 0 0
bernintheusa
PaganWoman wrote:
Paper, iPhone, Kindle - download PDFs - mostly I like paper - but I am getting used to the kindle and you can carry so many books on one device.  I can't do too many books at a time because I confuse the characters in fiction - non-fiction is even easier.


Kindle's X-Ray is really handy for me. Heck, I could use it in real life. You know, who is that person ? Do I know him ?  I am terrible about remembering names.
[3e37b5472dfc1614b78ba3d6c20243e2]
Quote 0 0
davidgmills
Not very well.
Ye shall know the phony left by the gates they keep.
Quote 0 0
djean111
Paper books.  I have LOTS.  Probably a couple thousand.  Shelves loaded with books, in the garage.  I do re-read some things, too.  Like Le Carre.   I am, as an aside, trying to do away with anything I can (obviously not the internet!) that uses electricity.  Right now I am in a murder mystery mood, so - it is surprising what good stuff I can get at Dollar Tree.  There is so much fiction I just will not read (won't detail that, everything is subjective!), but some good Scandinavian and Portuguese and British mysteries have found their way there, and my more financially secure sister buys books a lot, and I borrow them when we are speaking.  When I was working, I haunted Barnes and Noble, especially the sale stacks, like others would haunt the mall.

I will read more than one book at a time, I read the backs of cereal boxes.  I won't read Harlequin or nurse stuff.  Non-fiction, with the assumption that most may not be true.  Have always loved science fiction and some fantasy.  Love cookbooks.

There is nothing (IMO and all that) like holding a book, reading it straight through because I don't want to stop, and then feeling bereft because I can never read it again for the first time.  
Quote 0 0
Iggy2
I like non-fiction. We used to go to book sales and sell a few on the net. That came to an end in 2007. I've been trying to reduce the volume that were left. Found a couple of good titles recently while going through the bunch: Elmer Gantry, first ed. with a good dust jacket and a first of the Jungle book. It will take a couple of years, but it's fun anyway.
The only thing I read on cereal boxes is the nutritional information box.
Quote 0 0
beebee
Iggy2 wrote:
 and a first of the Jungle book. It will take a couple of years, but it's fun anyway.



Funny you should say that! 
I too have an older, 1950 edition of Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book. 

I had to let go of a lot of of my books when I moved from coast to coast, but I do think it's important we hold on to some of these treasures.

IMG_2112.jpg  IMG_2113.jpg  IMG_2115.jpg 
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0
Iggy2
What's interesting as well, is how the content will change as time goes-on. I have noticed that many older texts would be considered racist Today and have changed with editing out of controversial passages. One good example is Charles Dickens, who was a very prolific writer, and many of his passages have been edited out for various reasons. I have a massive 19th Century compilation of his work that bares little resemblance to modern versions.. From a historical Point, it's good to see the original context, even though it might cause some emotional discomfort.
Quote 0 0
beebee
They are period pieces and by leaving the original content intact, allows us to see how people actually thought back then.
We will not win fighting what we hate but by saving what we love.

Keep Calm and Carry On 👍


Quote 0 0